Cooking Collard Greens: A Northern’s Approach to this Healthy Crop

Cooking collard greens is different than greens like spinach and chard. However their nutritional value and unique taste, is worth the wait.

Cooking collard greens is something that I didn’t think I would be doing this summer. However, when I received a nice bunch of this healthy veggie from the Stone Church Acres CSA, I knew I had to give it a try. In this week’s Tuesday in the Garden we are sharing more garden-to-table recipes. Don’t forget to check out the other great recipes at the bottom of this post.

Cooking Collard Greens

Cooking collard greens is different than greens like spinach and chard. However their nutritional value and unique taste, is worth the wait.

I’ve only tasted collard greens a couple of times. They seem to be offered a lot in the south, however, here in Pennsylvania it’s rare to find collard greens on the menu.

Cooking collard greens is different than greens like spinach and chard. However their nutritional value and unique taste, is worth the wait.

The gentleman at the farm made sure to tell me to remove the thick center stem before cooking. Then either use the stems for stock or toss them in the compost pile.

Cooking collard greens is different than greens like spinach and chard. However their nutritional value and unique taste, is worth the wait.

After discussing this healthy veggie with the people at Stone Church Acres and a little online research, I found out that there appear to be two keys to cooking collard greens. One is to slice them thin, so that there is more surface area to cook.

Cooking collard greens is different than greens like spinach and chard. However their nutritional value and unique taste, is worth the wait.

The second important practice to note when cooking collard greens is that they need time. Unlike cooking spinach or chard which cook up almost immediately, collard greens are tougher, and need to be braised a bit.

Most of the recipes I found used bacon as the fat to cook the greens, but I decided to stick with my usual EVOO. Do you know what? They were really delicious. Even my picky brother-in-law liked this healthy dish. I would definitely make them again.

Cooking Collard Greens Recipe

Cooking collard greens is different than greens like spinach and chard. However their nutritional value and unique taste, is worth the wait.
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Collard Greens

Ingredients

  • 3 cup collard greens, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic slightly smashed
  • 1 cup vegetable stock
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions

  1. Wash collard greens, remove center stem and slice thinly.

  2. In a large skillet saute smashed garlic in olive oil for about 1 minute, then remove garlic

  3. Add collard greens, salt and pepper to skillet, and saute for 2 -3 minutes

  4. Add vegetable stock and stir. 

  5. Cover and reduce heat to low for 20 minutes.

  6. Add the garlic back in and red wine vinegar.

  7. Cook for another 5 minutes and serve.

Now let’s see what my fellow Tuesdays in the Garden friends are sharing this week. 

Tuesdays in the garden group photo.

 

 

Greek Salmon Sheet Pan Dinner

Greek Sheet Pan Dinner @ Simplify Live Love

 

Ginger garlic green beans

 Ginger Garlic Green Beans @ Frugal Family Home

 

15 Farm to table recipes15 Farm to Table Recipes @ Angie The Freckled Rose

 

Ham Bone Soup

Ham Bone Soup – @ An Oregon Cottage

About Patti Estep

Patti is the creator of Hearth and Vine, a home and garden blog filled with projects to inspire your creative side. She loves crafting, gardening, decorating and entertaining at her home in Pennsylvania. When she is not working on a project at home or searching for treasures at nurseries and thrift stores with her girlfriends, you’ll probably find her with family and friends, at a restaurant, or home party enjoying new and different food adventures.

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Comments

  1. My grandparents were from Arkansas and used to cook collared greens. I can’t say that I liked them much when I was a kid, but I did like them when I visited Selma, Alabama this spring! I’d probably stick with bacon grease, though. I use it for a lot of cooking. 🙂

    • Hi Michelle,

      It’s funny how our tastes changes as we grow up. I’m sure bacon is fabulous, but I hate the lingering smell and my waistline needs a little help too, but I’ll have to try it one day soon.

  2. love collards! They are very healthy; I have ate my fair share of them growing up.

  3. Yum! I grew up eating cooked greens covered in olive oil, vinegar and garlic… Oh how I loved it…. I’m hoping to get my Startle Garden Up and growing for a late fall harvest. Which means I’ll probably be purchasing already started plants…. I miss the greens!!!

  4. This is so helpful Patti – being from the PNW I’ve never eaten collards and didn’t know what to do with them. Thanks!

    • Hi Jami,

      Isn’t fun to try new veggies. This is one of the things I love about being a CSA member. Last week they gave me a yellow watermelon. Never even knew there was such a thing.

  5. My grandparents were from the south but I’ve never had collard greens. I wouldn’t have known to cook them for so long, that’s good to know. At the discount grocery store, I shop they often have collard greens cheap, I’ll have to pick up a bunch next time and give them a try with your recipe.

  6. I have never eaten these greens Patti. They look a lot like Kale, though I bet they taste quite different. Now I’m curious about them. I doubt they will grow in our garden zone but maybe I will find them in the store sometime. Thank you for introducing this new vegetable to us Northerners! This recipe looks so delicious!

    • Hi Diane,

      I have never grown collards myself but the farm that sponsors the CSA where I got them from is pretty close to my house and I’m in zone 6a which is pretty far north if that helps. They were definitely fun to try and tasted a little bit like cabbage.

  7. This looks simple and delicious. Two things I look for when cooking! I always wish collards and greens were more common here in the Northeast. I’ve always wanted to travel south and see them on an actual menu! Thanks for the great recipe, I can’t wait to try making them 🙂

    • Hi Angie,

      That’s funny. I think of myself as a northerner (not as north as you are), but these greens were grown locally. Maybe the farm here is ahead of its time. I hope you get to try them sometime soon.

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